The cross: God’s altar

Every believer has some theology of the atonement.  Faith, after all, is trust in a crucified Saviour, and without some understanding such faith is impossible.  Faith knows from the beginning who died on the cross, and it knows, too, why he died.  He died for our sins.

But faith can never be content with such elementary knowledge.  It wants to live its whole life at the foot of the cross, seeking with every passing day to understand it better.

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Is Allah God?

Many centuries have passed since there was any meaningful dialogue between Muslims and Christians, mainly because the two religions are like chalk and cheese.  Christianity is a profoundly theological faith: Islam, like Judaism, is a way of life.  Jews have the Torah, Muslims have Sharia, but while both appear to build on the Old Testament, the two sets of laws have diverged widely.  There is no parallel in Judaism to Islam’s attitudes towards women, nor would Judaism tolerate the thousand-lash floggings which besmirch the name of Saudi Arabia; something we should stop condoning on the principle, ‘It’s a sovereign state, and that’s their way.’  In Verwoerd’s South Africa, apartheid was their way, and the world responded with crippling sanctions.  Why go pussy-footing around Saudi Arabia?

Anyway, as I was going to say, because Islam is first and foremost a way of life it has no detailed theology of, for example, sin and salvation; and where it does venture into theology it is usually only to deny Christian beliefs.

Which is not to say but that there are things we seem to agree on, not least with regard to Jesus.  Muslims agree that he was born of a virgin, that he performed wondrous miracles of healing, that he raised the dead, and that he was a great prophet: indeed, next to Mohammed, the very greatest.

Yet when all is said and done, Islamic theology is much more negative than positive.  It’s a theology of denial, and the most remarkable of its denials is that Christ was never crucified.  God, it is claimed, would never have allowed such a fate to befall a great prophet.  Instead, he was taken up to heaven, and some other man was crucified in his place (some have suggested it was Judas Iscariot).

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Seasonal greetings and Christian values

In their recent Seasonal Messages the leaders of all our main political parties called in one way or another for a return to Christian values.  It wasn’t always clear whether these values included belief in a deity, but the party-leaders were unanimous about charity.  Perhaps they would also want to include humility?  This would be a fine thing.  After all, it was of this grace that Augustine said that it was the first thing in Christianity, and the second thing, and the third thing; and if our leaders espouse it we are left with an alluring picture of Messrs Cameron, Milliband and Clegg standing outside No. 10 each saying to the other, ‘After you!’ (with a wistful Mr. Salmond looking on).

But humility comes at a price.  Thinking others better than yourself and putting their interests before your own doesn’t come to any of us naturally, and least of all to politicians.  Humility is not an act, but an attitude of mind.  It is the willingness to be nothing, and it’s no guarantee of a Nobel Peace Prize.  In fact, the only man who ever really exemplified it ended up being crucified, and that wasn’t just by the press.

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The Spirit of Christmas

The trouble with Christmas is that it reminds me of all the people who are not going to enjoy it: Alistair Cooke, the sacked England cricket-captain; a friend recently diagnosed with Motor Neuron Disease; North Sea oil-workers facing unemployment; Syrian refugees; Christians in Iranian jails; the victims of ancient hatreds in the country of Jesus’ birth.

Yet there is still the magic of it. It’s been a couple of years since I last hanged my stocking, modern Christmas-puddings no longer contain threepenny-bits, I can’t see much hope of going sledging down the moor, trousers frozen hard from knees to boots, and even if I do get an apple, an orange and a bottle of lemonade they won’t taste the same as they did in 1947, when an oxo-cube was a treat.  But there is still the joy of sending letters to Santa telling him I’d like socks; the joy of seeing others glad with what he’s brought them; the luxury of a day when you can do nothing, with the tacit approval of conscience; the turkey which is ‘perfectly cooked’ even when it isn’t, and tastes better than a Bronze even though it’s only a Frozen.

And, above all, the carols: ringing in my head ever since Primary Three, and now ringing out at Classic FM, Free Church carol-services, and school-concerts where Buddhists, Muslims and Edinburgh City councillors join happily with Christians in singing of ‘our heavenly Lord, that with his blood mankind hath bought’.

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We preach Christ crucified

 

When Paul wrote his First Epistle to the Corinthians, he clearly felt himself forced on the defensive.  Some parties in the church there were highly critical of his ministry and compared him very unfavourably with the ‘super-apostles’: men distinguished both by the superior wisdom they taught and by the rhetorical skills they deployed in delivering their message.  Paul has no inclination to answer the charges on these terms.  He cannot claim to be either as erudite a philosopher or as mesmeric an orator as these brilliant communicators.  But, then, that wasn’t what he was about.  His call was to a very different kind of ministry:  ‘we preach Christ crucified: a stumbling-block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, but to those whom God has called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God.’ (1 Cor. 1:23-24)  Nor was he merely claiming that this was the best style of ministry for him personally.  His claim was that if we are called to the ministry of the word (whether as apostles, prophets, evangelists or pastors) this is the only legitimate way of performing the duties of our office.

But, more specifically, what is he saying?

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‘Semper reformanda’ or ‘semper mutanda’?

The popularity of the phrase semper reformanda seems to be on the up-and-up.  Yet two serious questions haunt it.

The first, though far the less important, is, Who was the first to use it.  Many have enquired and searched diligently but the answer still seems to elude us.  It doesn’t occur in any of the great Reformed confessions or in the works of the magisterial Reformers, including Calvin.  It’s not even clear what exactly we’re looking for.  The phrase, semper reformanda, can’t stand by itself, yet we don’t seem to know what other bits were originally attached to it.  Presumably, the subject of semper reformanda should be ecclesia reformata, so that whatever semper reformanda  means it is something that should be done either by or to the Reformed church.  But the precise statement, Ecclesia reformata reformanda est, is proving very difficult to find; and if found at all will probably turn up in the writings of one of the more obscure theologians (or their opponents), not in the works of one of the Masters.

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John Knox

Among all the makers of the Scottish Reformed Church one stands pre-eminent: John Knox.  To some, he was the greatest-ever Scotsman.  To others, such as Andrew Lang and Edwin Muir, he was a paranoid bigot responsible for all the ills we have suffered since the Reformation.

Yet, for all the attention he has received, key facts in Knox’s life remain a mystery.  Even his place and date of birth are uncertain.  The general consensus is that he was born at Haddington in East  Lothian. But when?  The traditional date was 1505, but recent scholars prefer 1513-14.  Over against this we have to set the fact that in 1564 a contemporary described Knox as “a decrepit old priest”.  If he was born only in 1513-14, he must have been decrepit in his late forties: a claim that the rest of the young elderly will find hard to thole.

Other details of Knox’s life prior to the martyrdom of George Wishart in 1547 are equally scanty.  He was educated at St Andrews, where one of his professors was John Major, a scholar of European renown.  In 1536 he was ordained as a Catholic priest, but by 1544 he was Wishart’s companion.  When Wishart was arrested, Knox pressed to go with him, but Master George turned him back with the words, “Nay, return to your bairns, and God bless you.  One is sufficient for a sacrifice.”

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The Highland churches and the First World War

Few historians of the First World War have deigned to consult the ‘Monthly Record’ of the Free Church of Scotland.  That is their loss.  The ‘Record’ might have had little contact with so-called ‘men of affairs’, but it was in very close contact with ministers, chaplains, soldiers, sailors and, above all, with Highland parishes.  Its editor, Archibald McNeilage, was a brilliant professional journalist; and the annual Reports of the Church’s Highlands and Islands Committee still give a splendid insight into the social problems of the time.

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The New Calvinists

 

Most of our readers now sleep soundly, secure in the knowledge that Calvinists are extinct.  After all, you never see one on telly, and it’s a good seven years since the last stamping on fiddles or smashing of bagpipes.

But being, as it were, possessed of inside knowledge, I knew there were still some Calvinists around.  I had even seen one or two, though much harder to spot than of yore, since they no longer wore black hats.

Now the really bad news.  Not only are there still a few Calvinists around, but another closely related species has suddenly appeared: New Calvinists, the same but different.

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Independence: greater personal freedom?

Once more into the breach.  I fervently hope it’s for the last time; and I fervently hope I have not been born to write the obituary of my country.

There is a well-loved saying among university lecturers, ‘The trouble with students is that they interfere with your work.’  But that’s as nothing compared with the way that the Referendum has interfered with Scottish life.  To it, the Holyrood Parliament dedicated the longest election campaign in British history, and by doing so they put the whole nation on hold.  The new powers to be devolved to the Scottish Parliament are on hold; the levels of Income Tax and Corporation Tax are on hold; Rosyth and BAE Systems are on hold; the Royal Regiment of Scotland are on hold; Scottish MPs sitting at Westminster are on hold; Prime Minister’s Questions are on hold; the Queen is on hold; I am on hold; the very swallows which by now should be flying off to Africa are on hold, fearful of taking a last farewell of the Scotland they love.

When I say, ‘on hold’, I don’t mean hesitating between two opinions, the Nationalist and the Unionist.  I mean ‘on hold’ because on all the crucial questions the SNP refuse to give answers.  We are offered only a blank cheque, promising ‘Independence’ but always with the rider, ‘Leave the details to us.’

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